Posts Tagged "Plants"

Calendula

Posted by on Dec 8, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Calendula

Calendula is reminiscent of the sun with deep golden-yellow or orange petals radiating out from a central yellow core. The flowers actually open and close with the sun. Each petal is slightly serrated, giving the blossom a feeling of delicacy. During the summer I could not find a source for dried calendula, as my trusty resource, Gathering Thyme,in San Anselmo, could not get a supply at that time.  I had previously noticed some lovely, lush, green sprouts appearing in an unplanted section of my garden, and sure enough, just when we were in need for the children, the plants started blooming...

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Elder Berry

Posted by on Nov 25, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Elder Berry

I consider Elder Berry the queen of herbal medicine for children over the age of one. Each year in early fall, it seems, the children start coming in with runny noses, some with coughs, and I think of Elder. It has been used all over the world for thousands of years for many ailments and is still very effective now for treating colds and flu. It tames viruses, clears chest congestion, sooths sore throats (among many other things) and the syrup is unbelievably yummy. I was first introduced to Elderberry syrup through Cheryl Fromholzer at Gathering Thyme. Her syrup blend of Elder Berries,...

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Yarrow

Posted by on Nov 11, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Yarrow

Beautiful Yarrow- the grey-green leaves are lacy and often described as feathery. Its species name is “millefolium”, meaning “thousand leaves”, referring to the thousands of tiny leaflets. The flowerets (little flowers) gather in a rounded bouquet of white extending up from the stem. Yarrow has been used since ancient times to treat wounds. The crushed leaves can stop bleeding but is also excellent for burns, bruises, toothaches and nosebleeds, just to name a few.  A poultice, which the children previously made with Plantain, can easily be made of the leaves. We hadn’t explored...

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Chamomile

Posted by on Oct 20, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Chamomile

Bringing chamomile into the classroom was a compete delight. Chamomile is a lovely plant and in full bloom this time of year- the sweetest white daisy-like flowers with brilliant yellow spheres at the center. It is also a well-known herb, popularized because of its calming if not gently sedating affect. The Kid’s Herb Book calls it the “calm child herb”. Having made an infusion with Lemon Balm previously it was a natural progression to make a chamomile tea. The children loved it so much they have frequently asked to have it with lunch! The calming effect of the herb can also be...

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Cinnamon

Posted by on Oct 17, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Cinnamon

Cinnamon was interesting for the children because, unlike the previous herbs, cinnamon was familiar- think of cookies and cinnamon toast! What they didn’t know, of course, was that cinnamon comes from the bark of a tree. You can’t rub it between your fingers and get a delightful aroma but you can taste it by licking it!  Since it doesn’t grow here, being a tropical plant, photographs and drawings had to suffice. We decided to make mulled cider and an electuary- a medicinal delivery system from Ayruveda utilizing honey mixed with a powdered herb. My experience is limited to honey and...

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